Feeling the urge to spring into action?
Florida's natural springs are in peril and they need our help.


Many springs suffer from heightened salinity levels due to a decrease in freshwater flowing from these
springs, compounded by the rise in sea-level. According to the Southwest Florida Water Management District, sea-level monitoring has shown a local rise of seven inches over the past 100 years. Under these circumstances, freshwater vegetation struggles to survive in such salty conditions, and invasive aquatic
plants and unwanted algae species take over.

Evidence of deteriorating spring conditions. Photos by John Moran.

Evidence of deteriorating spring conditions. Photos by John Moran.

Help protect Florida's natural springs by:

  • Purchasing a Protect Florida Springs license plate!
  • Resist the temptation to over-fertilize and over-water your lawn. Use a rain gauge to help determine how often you need to water.
  • Plant native or drought-tolerant trees, shrubs, and flowers to minimize water use on your property. 
  • Use mulch in plant beds and leave your grass clippings on the lawn after mowing; this helps prevent evaporation of moisture from the soil.
  • Use rain barrels to capture and reuse rainwater to water plants and gardens.
  • Insure that your septic tank and drainfield are properly maintained.
  • Help reduce the amount of water you waste by taking shorter showers, turning off the faucet when washing dishes by hand or brushing your teeth, and regularly checking your pipes and toilets for leaks.
  • Stay on established trails, boardwalks, and canoe launch ramps at all times whenever visiting a spring.
  • When snorkeling or swimming at springs, try to avoid trampling underwater vegetation and stirring up sediments with your flippers.
  • Use extreme caution when boating and anchoring in spring runs. Anchors, props and boat groundings destroy aquatic vegetation and increase the cloudiness of the water.
  • Be mindful! Please dispose of all trash into proper trash or recycling bins whenever visiting a spring or natural park.
  • Donate your time, resources, or services to local and statewide nonprofit organizations that are working hard to protect these incredible natural wonders.
     
A manatee in three Sisters Spring, Crystal River. Photo by David Schrichte.

A manatee in three Sisters Spring, Crystal River. Photo by David Schrichte.

Sea to Shore Alliance and the Fish & Wildlife Foundation
of Florida are working together to enhance protection
of the state's natural springs.


sea to shore alliance

Instrumental in the creation of the Protect Florida Springs license plate in 2007, Sea to Shore Alliance also chairs the Springs Grants Committee and documents crucial springs habitat, human use, and restoration activities in Florida. Results are provided to state and federal managers to assist in establishing adequate protection for valuable spring habitat.

Fish & wildlife foundation of fl

As steward of the Protect Florida Springs license plate and Springs Grants Program, the Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida helps sustain ongoing community-based initiatives aimed at springs restoration, protection, and education around the state. Since 1994, more than $25 million has been raised and given away in support of conservation.

 
Divers at Blue Hole, Ichetucknee Springs. Photo by John Moran.

Divers at Blue Hole, Ichetucknee Springs. Photo by John Moran.


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